#!/usr/bin/perl

=head1 NAME

IO_Scalar_synopsis - test out IO::Scalar

=head1 SYNOPSIS

    ### From our distribution's top level directory:
    perl -I./lib examples/IO_Scalar_synopsis 

=cut

use 5.005;
use IO::Scalar;
use strict;

my $line = ('-' x 60)."\n";
my $somestring = "My message:\n";

###
### Perform I/O on strings, using the basic OO interface...
###

### Open a handle on a string, and append to it:
print $line;
my $SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
$SH->print("Hello");  
$SH->print(", world!\nBye now!\n");  
print "The string is now: ", $somestring, "\n";

### Open a handle on a string, read it line-by-line, then close it:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
while (defined($_ = $SH->getline)) { 
    print "Got line: $_";
}
$SH->close;

### Open a handle on a string, and slurp in all the lines:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
print "All lines:\n", $SH->getlines; 

### Get the current position (either of two ways):
my $pos = $SH->getpos;         
my $offset = $SH->tell;  

### Set the current position (either of two ways):
$SH->setpos($pos);        
$SH->seek($offset, 0);

### Open an anonymous temporary scalar:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar;
$SH->print("Hi there!");
print "I printed: ", ${$SH->sref}, "\n";      ### get at value




### Don't like OO for your I/O?  No problem.  
### Thanks to the magic of an invisible tie(), the following now 
### works out of the box, just as it does with IO::Handle:
   
### Open a handle on a string, and append to it:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
print $SH "Hello";    
print $SH ", world!\nBye now!\n";
print "The string is now: ", $somestring, "\n";

### Open a handle on a string, read it line-by-line, then close it:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
while (<$SH>) {
    print "Got line: $_";
}
close $SH;

### Open a handle on a string, and slurp in all the lines:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$somestring;
print "All lines:\n", <$SH>;

### Get the current position (WARNING: requires 5.6):
$offset = tell $SH;

### Set the current position (WARNING: requires 5.6):
seek $SH, $offset, 0;

### Open an anonymous temporary scalar:
print $line;
$SH = new IO::Scalar;
print $SH "Hi there!";
print "I printed: ", ${$SH->sref}, "\n";      ### get at value





### Stringification:
print $line;
my $str = "";
$SH = new IO::Scalar \$str;
print $SH "Hello, ";
print $SH "world!";
print "I printed: $SH\n";


### Done!
1;