NAME

MarpaX::ESLIF::Tutorial::Calculator - MarpaX::ESLIF Calculator Tutorial

VERSION

version 3.0.18

DESCRIPTION

This documentation is giving a tutorial with a calculator as example. The reader might want first to read the MarpaX::ESLIF::BNF specification.

STARTUP

First we get an ESLIF instance, we use the Log::Any::Adapter::Stderr implementation for logging:

  package main;
  use strict;
  use diagnostics;
  use Log::Any qw/$log/;
  use Log::Any::Adapter qw/Stderr/;
  use MarpaX::ESLIF;

  my $eslif = MarpaX::ESLIF->new($log);

Direct result with the grammar's parse() method

Basic grammar

Grammar will support parenthesis, and the **, *, /, +, - operators:

  my $grammar_v1 = q{
  Expression ::=
      /[\d]+/
      | '(' Expression ')'              assoc => group
     ||     Expression '**' Expression  assoc => right
     ||     Expression  '*' Expression
      |     Expression  '/' Expression
     ||     Expression  '+' Expression
      |     Expression  '-' Expression
  };

Compiling the grammar is done with:

  my $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v1);

The ::= mean this is the top-level grammar. It could have be writen as :[0]:=.

The || loosen separator is a shortcut for grouping rules, Together with the associativity adverbs, the grammar listed upper is stricly equivalent to this traditional BNF form:

  Expression   ::= Expression_0
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_1
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_2
  Expression_2 ::= Expression_3
  Expression_3 ::= /[\d]+/
  Expression_3 ::= '(' Expression_0 ')'
  Expression_2 ::= Expression_3 '**' Expression_2
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_1 '*' Expression_2
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_1 '/' Expression_2
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_0 '+' Expression_1
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_0 '-' Expression_1

With no associativity, this would have been equivalent to:

  Expression   ::= Expression_0
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_1
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_2
  Expression_2 ::= Expression_3
  Expression_3 ::= /[\d]+/
  Expression_3 ::= '(' Expression_3 ')'
  Expression_2 ::= Expression_2 '**' Expression_3
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_1 '*' Expression_2
  Expression_1 ::= Expression_1 '/' Expression_2
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_0 '+' Expression_1
  Expression_0 ::= Expression_0 '-' Expression_1

You can see the impact of group associativity in the Expression_3 rule, and the impact of right associativity in the Expression_2 rule.

Since internally, a pure BNF implementation is in use, the use of the || loosen operator is indeed forcing the engine to act as if you would have writen in traditional BNF, this can be seen by asking for a dump of the grammar:

  #print $eslifGrammar->show;

One can already try to parse some input. Neverthless, to do so, MarpaX::ESLIF imposes to have a recognizer and a valuator instances:

Recognizer interface

A recognizer must provide the following methods: read, isEof, isCharacterStream, encoding, data, isWithDisableThreshold, isWithExhaustion, isWithNewline and isWithTrack. We will instanciate a recognizer for a string;

  package MyRecognizer;
  use strict;
  use diagnostics;
  #
  # Constructor
  #
  sub new {
    my ($pkg, $string) = @_;
    open my $fh, "<", \$string;
    bless { data => undef, fh => $fh }, $pkg
  }

read returns a true value if data was read, isEof returns a true value if EOF is reached, isCharacterStream returns a true value if this the last data is composed of characters, encoding return the encoding if known, data returns the data, isWithDisableThreshold switches off a hardcoded internal warning when grammar seems to have problems -; isWithExhaustion enables exhaustion event, isWithNewline enables newline counting for error reporting, and isWithTrack enables absolute position tracking if you plan to use one of the lastCompletedOffset(), lastCompletedLength() or lastCompletedLocation() recognizer methods:

  #
  # Required methods
  #
  sub read                   {
                               my ($self) = @_;   # read data
                               defined($self->{data} = readline($self->{fh}))
                             }
  sub isEof                  {  eof shift->{fh} } # End of data ?
  sub isCharacterStream      {                1 } # Character stream ?
  sub encoding               {                  } # Encoding ?
  sub data                   {    shift->{data} } # data
  sub isWithDisableThreshold {                0 } # Disable threshold warning ?
  sub isWithExhaustion       {                0 } # Exhaustion event ?
  sub isWithNewline          {                1 } # Newline count ?
  sub isWithTrack            {                0 } # Absolute position tracking ?
Valuator interface

A valuator must be an object that can do: isWithHighRankOnly, isWithOrderByRank, isWithAmbiguous, isWithNull, maxParses, getResult and setResult:

  package MyValue;
  use strict;
  use diagnostics;
  #
  # Constructor
  #
  sub new { bless { result => undef}, shift }

isWithHighRankOnly select only rules that have the highest eventual rank adverb, isWithOrderByRank orders by rank, isWithAmbiguous allows ambiguous parse tree value (i.e. there is more than one value), isWithNull allows a null parse, maxParses gives the maximum number of wanted parse tree values (0 means unlimited), and for every value iteration, there are a getters and a setter on the result: getResult and setResult, respectively.

  #
  # Required methods
  #
  sub isWithHighRankOnly { 1 }  # When there is the rank adverb: highest ranks only ?
  sub isWithOrderByRank  { 1 }  # When there is the rank adverb: order by rank ?
  sub isWithAmbiguous    { 0 }  # Allow ambiguous parse ?
  sub isWithNull         { 0 }  # Allow null parse ?
  sub maxParses          { 0 }  # Maximum number of parse tree values
  #
  # ... result getter and setter
  #
  sub getResult          { my ($self) = @_; $self->{result} }
  sub setResult          { my ($self, $result) = @_; $self->{result} = $result }

Immediate parsing

So far, so good. The default actions for symbols and rules is always to concatenate token that was read automatically. Characters are always interpreted in UTF-8 encoding, regardless of the original encoding. So we expect the output of parsing e.g. (1+2)*3 to be... (1+2)*3:

  package main;

  my $input = '(1+2)*3';
  my $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  my $eslifValueInterface = MyValue->new();

  my $result = $eslifGrammar->parse($eslifRecognizerInterface, $eslifValueInterface) ? $eslifValueInterface->getResult : '??';
  printf "Default parse tree value of $input: %s\n", $result;
  # Default parse tree value of (1+2)*3: (1+2)*3

We used the parse() method of the grammar, a short-hand version of parsing that does not allow interaction not any event.

Note that ::concat will also happily concatenate alternatives pushed by the end-user, then it is the Perl's "stringification" of the alternative that is taken, as-is, i.e. as an array of bytes regardless of any encoding. Up to the end user to eventually make sure this is UTF-8 compatible (and it is the case by default in Perl).

Grammar and :discard symbol

Usually, input is likey to have newlines, spaces, etc... we introduce as many. :discard symbols as wanted, for example to discard spaces, C-like and perl comments:

  my $grammar_v2 = $grammar_v1 . q{
  :discard ::= /[\s]+/
  :discard ::= /(?:(?:(?:\/\/)(?:[^\n]*)(?:\n|\z))|(?:(?:\/\*)(?:(?:[^\*]+|\*(?!\/))*)(?:\*\/)))/
  :discard ::= /#[^\n]*(?:\n|\z)/
  };
  $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v2);

We test it on an input that have things to discard, i.e.:

  $input = q{( /* C comment */1+2)
  # perl comment
  *3};
  $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  $eslifValueInterface = MyValue->new();
  $result = $eslifGrammar->parse($eslifRecognizerInterface, $eslifValueInterface) ? $eslifValueInterface->getResult : '??';
  printf "Default parse tree value of $input: %s\n", $result;
  # Default parse tree value of ( /* C comment */1+2)
  # # perl comment
  # *3: (1+2)*3

The output is the same: :discard rules have skipped everything non-accepted by the grammar, but declared with :discard definitions.

You will have noticed that regular expressions are allowed, and MarpaX::ESLIF arranges with the case when there is a match but the stream is not finished. For instance, reading character by character would produce the same result:

  package MyRecognizer;
  no warnings 'redefine';
  sub read                   {
                               my ($self) = @_;   # read data
                               CORE::read($self->{fh}, $self->{data}, 1) ? 1 : 0
                             }

Though please note that reading character per character, which means very few bytes per very few bytes without encoding information, can drive to a false encoding guess from MarpaX::ESLIF. In such a case, you can help the engine by giving the encoding of the latest chunk of data:

  #package MyRecognizer;
  #no warnings 'redefine';
  #sub encoding               { 'ASCII' } # Encoding ?

Grammar and actions

Obviously we want the calculator to be able to perform the arithmetic: taking advantage that perl will always convert when necessary depending on the context, we do not need to have an action on /[\d]+/, just action on the expression with the operators:

  package main;
  my $grammar_v3 = q{
  Expression ::=
      /[\d]+/
      | '(' Expression ')'              assoc => group action => ::copy[1]
     ||     Expression '**' Expression  assoc => right action => do_pow
     ||     Expression  '*' Expression                 action => do_mul
      |     Expression  '/' Expression                 action => do_div
     ||     Expression  '+' Expression                 action => do_plus
      |     Expression  '-' Expression                 action => do_minus
      :discard ::= /[\s]+/
  };
  $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v3);

The actions must be implemented in the valuator interface, otherwise parsing will well with something like:

  # Can't locate object method "do_plus" via package "MyValue" at ...
Grammar actions

The special action ::copy[1] is clear: take the RHS number 1 (first is at indice 0) and copy its value. The actions are trivial:

  package MyValue;
  sub do_pow   { my ($self, $left, $op, $right) = @_; $left**$right }
  sub do_mul   { my ($self, $left, $op, $right) = @_; $left*$right }
  sub do_div   { my ($self, $left, $op, $right) = @_; $left/$right }
  sub do_plus  { my ($self, $left, $op, $right) = @_; $left+$right }
  sub do_minus { my ($self, $left, $op, $right) = @_; $left-$right }

  package main;
  $input = q{(1 + 2) * 3};
  $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  $eslifValueInterface = MyValue->new();
  $result = $eslifGrammar->parse($eslifRecognizerInterface, $eslifValueInterface) ? $eslifValueInterface->getResult : '??';
  printf "Default parse tree value of $input: %s\n", $result;
  # Default parse tree value of (1 + 2) * 3: 9
Error output

Any error is automatically sent to the logger with the error logging level, for example with an unparsable input:

  $input = q{(1 + 2) * 3 + ( ab};
  # Remember that we are using the 'read-one-character-per-character' implementation
  $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  $eslifValueInterface = MyValue->new();
  $eslifGrammar->parse($eslifRecognizerInterface, $eslifValueInterface);

would produce:

  --------------------------------------------
  Recognizer failure. Current state:
  [P1@9..9] Expression[0] ::= . Expression[1]
  [P2@9..9] Expression[1] ::= . Expression[2]
  [P3@9..9] Expression[2] ::= . Expression[3]
  [P4@9..9] Expression[3] ::= . /[\d]+/
  [P5@9..9] Expression[3] ::= . '('
  [P5@9..9]                   Expression[0]
  [P5@9..9]                   ')'
  [P6@9..9] Expression[2] ::= . Expression[3]
  [P6@9..9]                   '**'
  [P6@9..9]                   Expression[2]
  [P7@9..9] Expression[1] ::= . Expression[1]
  [P7@9..9]                   '*'
  [P7@9..9]                   Expression[2]
  [P8@9..9] Expression[1] ::= . Expression[1]
  [P8@9..9]                   '/'
  [P8@9..9]                   Expression[2]
  [P9@9..9] Expression[0] ::= . Expression[0]
  [P9@9..9]                   '+'
  [P9@9..9]                   Expression[1]
  [P10@9..9] Expression[0] ::= . Expression[0]
  [P10@9..9]                   '-'
  [P10@9..9]                   Expression[1]
  [R5@8..9] Expression[3] ::= '('
  [R5@8..9]                   . Expression[0]
  [R5@8..9]                   ')'
  --------------------------------------------
  Expected terminal: /[\d]+/
  Expected terminal: '('
  --------------------------------------------
  UTF-8 converted data before the failure (16 bytes)
  0x000000: 28 31 20 2b 20 32 29 20 2a 20 33 20 2b 20 28 20 (1 + 2) * 3 + ( 
  --------------------------------------------
  <<<<<< RECOGNIZER FAILURE AFTER LINE No 1 COLUMN No 16, HERE: >>>>>>
  --------------------------------------------
  UTF-8 converted data after the failure (1 bytes)
  0x000000: 61                                              a               
  --------------------------------------------

This the default behaviour: parsing failure always outputs:

the position in the grammar
the expected lexemes (i.e. terminals)
an hexadecimal dump before and after the failure
In case of a character stream, dump is the UTF-8 representation of the input
In case of a binary stream, dump is the exact representation of the input

Interaction with parsing

Grammar's parse() method is great for an immediate valuation. This nevertheless imposes that no interaction is possible while parsing the input, and this include any notion of event (any eventual event in the grammar is switched off automatically - we come back later on the events).

Events are possible on both terminals (aka the lexemes) and rules.

General structure of interaction

This is always starting with an MarpaX::ESLIF::Recognizer's instance scan() method, that can be called only once in a recognizer's lifetime, and only at its very beginning. It is rarelly needed to have the very early events, this is why this scan() method have an optional scalar argument that, when it is a true value, enables the initial events:

  $input = q{(1 + 2) * 3};
  # Our usual ESLIF Recognizer interface
  $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  # ESLIF Recognizer engine
  my $eslifRecognizer = MarpaX::ESLIF::Recognizer->new($eslifGrammar, $eslifRecognizerInterface);
  #
  # Start scanning the input, we want initial events here
  #
  $eslifRecognizer->scan(1);

scan() can stop if there is an error, or if the parsing ended, or if there are events. To check for events you use the recognizer's events() method, that return a reference to an array of hashes:

  my $eventsRef = $eslifRecognizer->events();
  use Data::Dumper;
  print "Events are scan():\n" . Dumper($eventsRef);

Events remain untouched until you resume() the parsing, or interact with a method that can produce new events.

There are two major event scopes: grammar events, and lexeme events.

Grammar events

These events are on symbols or parse status, and generated directly by the marpa parser engine. The syntax in MarpaX::ESLIF BNF is: event event_name = event_type symbol, for example:

  my $grammar_v4 = $grammar_v3 . q{
    event ^Expression = predicted Expression
    };
  $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v4);
  $eslifRecognizer = MarpaX::ESLIF::Recognizer->new($eslifGrammar, $eslifRecognizerInterface);
  $eslifRecognizer->scan(1);
  $eventsRef = $eslifRecognizer->events();
  print "Events after scan():\n" . Dumper($eventsRef);

will produce:

  Events after scan():
  $VAR1 = [
            {
              'symbol' => 'Expression',
              'event' => '^Expression',
              'type' => 4
            }
          ];

and this is because we started the recognizer with the very initial events: $eslifRecognizer-scan(1)>, and indeed, the grammar start with the symbol Expression, we asked for the eventual prediction event and named it ^Expression. The type is always one of the values listed in MarpaX::ESLIF::Event::Type. For instance, 4 is the value for the prediction event type:

  use MarpaX::ESLIF::Event::Type;
  printf "MARPAESLIF_EVENTTYPE_PREDICTED is: %d\n", MarpaX::ESLIF::Event::Type->MARPAESLIF_EVENTTYPE_PREDICTED; # 4

Before resuming you have to check if you can resume, leading to the typical loop:

  scan()
  if (canContinue()) {
    do {
      resume()
    } while (canContinue())
  }

In the example below we take care to disable the initial event otherwise the loop would never end...: resume would retrigger the ^Expression event forever. Instead let's have a completion Expression$ event (having only grammar completion events makes always possible to resume at current position):

  my $grammar_v5 = $grammar_v4 . q{
    event Expression$ = completed Expression
    };
  $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v5);
  $eslifRecognizer = MarpaX::ESLIF::Recognizer->new($eslifGrammar, $eslifRecognizerInterface);
  #
  # Always start with scan()
  # ------------------------
  $eslifRecognizer->scan(1);
  print "Events after scan():\n" . Dumper($eslifRecognizer->events());
  $eslifRecognizer->eventOnOff('Expression', [ MarpaX::ESLIF::Event::Type->MARPAESLIF_EVENTTYPE_PREDICTED ], 0);
  #
  # -------------------------------
  # Always check if we can continue
  # -------------------------------
  if ($eslifRecognizer->isCanContinue) {
    do {
      #
      # resume() optional parameter is a number of BYTES.
      # Because we stopped with initial event ^Expression, it is okay in this specific case
      # and this specific grammar to resume() without changing the position, since we switched off
      # the only possible initial event ^Expression
      #
      $eslifRecognizer->resume();
      print "Events after resume():\n" . Dumper($eslifRecognizer->events());
    } while ($eslifRecognizer->isCanContinue)
  };

  Output is:

  Events after scan():
  $VAR1 = [
            {
              'event' => '^Expression',
              'symbol' => 'Expression',
              'type' => 4
            }
          ];
  Events after resume():
  $VAR1 = [
            {
              'type' => 1,
              'event' => 'Expression$',
              'symbol' => 'Expression'
            }
          ];
  Events after resume():
  $VAR1 = [
            {
              'type' => 1,
              'event' => 'Expression$',
              'symbol' => 'Expression'
            }
          ];
  Events after resume():
  $VAR1 = [
            {
              'symbol' => 'Expression',
              'event' => 'Expression$',
              'type' => 1
            }
          ];

Grammar events also include the nulled symbols and the exhaustion. Nulled events are for nulling symbols, exhaustion is when parsing is exhausted (i.e. it cannot accept input any more). For the later, the end-user always have exhaustion information event without the exhaustion event using the isExhausted() recognizer method. A grammar with nulled symbol could be:

  Expression ::=
                 /[\d]+/
               | '(' NulledSymbol Expression ')' assoc => group action => ::copy[1]
              ||     Expression '**' Expression  assoc => right action => do_pow
              ||     Expression  '*' Expression                 action => do_mul
               |     Expression  '/' Expression                 action => do_div
              ||     Expression  '+' Expression                 action => do_plus
               |     Expression  '-' Expression                 action => do_minus
  NulledSymbol ::=
  :discard ::= /[\s]+/
  event Expression$ = completed Expression
  event NulledSymbol[] = nulled NulledSymbol

Scanner events

Scanner events are not generating by the grammar itself, but by the recognizer, and they always concern the lexemes: parsing can be paused before a lexeme is seen, or after it has been seen (though not yet commited). Pauses after a lexeme is seen can always be simulated with a nulled grammar event, in contrary to pauses before a lexeme is seen. The syntax is always:

  :lexeme ::= lexemeSymbol pause => before event => eventName

or

  :lexeme ::= lexemeSymbol pause => after event => eventName

For example:

  Expression ::=
                 /[\d]+/
               | LPAREN Expression RPAREN           assoc => group action => ::copy[1]
              ||        Expression '**' Expression  assoc => right action => do_pow
              ||        Expression  '*' Expression                 action => do_mul
               |        Expression  '/' Expression                 action => do_div
              ||        Expression  '+' Expression                 action => do_plus
               |        Expression  '-' Expression                 action => do_minus
  :discard ::= /[\s]+/
  event Expression$ = completed Expression
  LPAREN ~ '('
  RPAREN ~ ')'
  :lexeme ::= LPAREN pause => after event => LPAREN$
  :lexeme ::= RPAREN pause => after event => RPAREN$

Injecting user-defined values in the parse tree

At any time where the control is given back to the user, user-defined perl values, that can be anything, can be injected. The most common method is:

  $eslifRecognizer->lexemeRead(symbolName, perlValue, lengthInBytes, grammarLength)

grammarLength is optional and default to 1, this is the number of symbols spanned, and should be rarelly of use... On the other hand, lengthInBytes is required, but may be zero (when it is zero you are really injecting things without moving the internal pointers). Please note that when this is a stream of characters, you have to think in terms of UTF-8 encoding for the number of bytes.

Since injecting values is possible only for lexemes, it is often practical to require a pause information from the recognizer with the method:

  $eslifRecognizer->lexemeLastPause(symbolName)

which will return a perl's string for the last paused information for lexeme symbolName, or undef if there is none. The number of bytes in this string is the relevant thing here.

User can also try lexemes, using:

  $eslifRecognizer->lexemeTry(symbolName)

and get the trial paused information with:

  $eslifRecognizer->lexemeLastTry(symbolName)

For example, we will change in the (1 + 2) * 3 every number by the itself powered by by , so that the input becomes on-the-fly: (1**2 + 2**2) * 3**2 in the next section with valuation:

Valuation

You have to create a valuator that is using your valuation interface: MarpaX::ESLIF::Value-new($eslifRecognizer, $eslifValueInterface)> and loop on the value() method until it returns false.

  my $grammar_v8 = q{
  Expression ::=
                 NUMBER
               | '(' Expression ')'              assoc => group action => ::copy[1]
              ||     Expression  POW Expression  assoc => right action => do_pow
              ||     Expression  '*' Expression                 action => do_mul
               |     Expression  '/' Expression                 action => do_div
              ||     Expression  '+' Expression                 action => do_plus
               |     Expression  '-' Expression                 action => do_minus
  :discard ::= /[\s]+/
  :lexeme ::= NUMBER pause => before event => ^NUMBER
  NUMBER     ~ /[\d]+/
  POW        ~ '**'
  };
  printf "Grammar:%s\n", $grammar_v8;
  $eslifGrammar = MarpaX::ESLIF::Grammar->new($eslif, $grammar_v8);
  $eslifRecognizerInterface = MyRecognizer->new($input);
  $eslifRecognizer = MarpaX::ESLIF::Recognizer->new($eslifGrammar, $eslifRecognizerInterface);
  $eslifRecognizer->scan();
  if ($eslifRecognizer->isCanContinue) {
    do {
      my $alreadyResumed = 0;
      foreach (@{$eslifRecognizer->events()}) {
        if ($_->{event}) {   # Can be undef for exhaustion
          if ($_->{event} eq '^NUMBER') {
            my $lastPause = $eslifRecognizer->lexemeLastPause($_->{symbol});
            printf "Pause before event %s for symbol %s: \"%s\"\n", $_->{event}, $_->{symbol}, $lastPause;
            # ------------------------------
            # We replace NUMBER by NUMBER*10
            # ------------------------------
            $eslifRecognizer->lexemeRead('NUMBER', $lastPause, 0);
            $eslifRecognizer->lexemeRead('POW', '**', 0);
            $eslifRecognizer->lexemeRead('NUMBER', '2', 0);
            # -------------------------------------------
            # We say to resume exactly where NUMBER ended
            # -------------------------------------------
            $eslifRecognizer->resume(bytes::length($lastPause));
            $alreadyResumed = 1;
            last
          }
        }
      }
      $eslifRecognizer->resume() unless $alreadyResumed
    } while ($eslifRecognizer->isCanContinue)
  }
  my $eslifValueInterface = MyValue->new();
  my $eslifValue = MarpaX::ESLIF::Value->new($eslifRecognizer, $eslifValueInterface);
  while ($eslifValue->value()) {
    #
    # (1**2 + 2**2) * 3**2 = 45
    #
    printf "======> %s\n", $eslifValueInterface->getResult;
  }

You may rememember that we said that the default value for a rule is always to concatenate the input and the alternatives stringification. And indeed, if we remove all the actions from the grammar above, it will try to concatenate all the lexemes and alternatives together, that would leave to this output:

  (1**2+2**2)*3**2

This is a neat way to remove automatically :discard rules from the input -;

You have to notice also that nothing obliges you to inject a alternative value that would be of the same length of what should be in the input. For instance, injecting the string *ANYTHING* for the POW token:

          $eslifRecognizer->lexemeRead('POW', '*ANYTHING*', 0);

would result in this stringification:

  (1*ANYTHING*2+2*ANYTHING*2)*3*ANYTHING*2

NOTES

All the examples above are adapted from Marpa::R2's Semantics documentation.

SEE ALSO

MarpaX::ESLIF

AUTHOR

Jean-Damien Durand <jeandamiendurand@free.fr>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

This software is copyright (c) 2017 by Jean-Damien Durand.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.