NAME

Linux::CDROM - Perl extension for accessing the CDROM-drive on Linux

SYNOPSIS

    use Linux::CDROM;

    my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/cdrom") or die $Linux::CDROM::error;
    
    $cd->play_ti( -from => 1, -to => 3 );
    
    while ((my $p = $cd->poll)->status == CDROM_AUDIO_PLAY) {
        my $track = $p->track;
        my ($min, $sec) = $p->rel_addr;
        print "Playing track $track at $min:$sec\n";
    }

DESCRIPTION

This module gives you access to your CDROM drive as granted by your kernel. You can use it for playing audio, grabbing the content off the CD in various formats etc.

Unless otherwise stated, all methods return an undefined value to indicate an error. You can then check the content of $! to see what went wrong. Please also see "ERROR REPORTING" that explains how to work with $Linux::CDROM::error.

Each method states which ioctl it implements. This should help people familiar with the various ioctls of the CDROM-drive to find their way around.

You should probably start with reading Linux::CDROM::Cookbook. It explains and exemplifies the concepts behind this module. After that you can return to this document as a reference for the countless methods and objects it provides.

METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM

The top-level object is always a Linux::CDROM. The object is created per-drive so you can have as many of these objects at the same time as you have CDROM-drives.

  • new(device)

    Creates a new Linux::CDROM instance. device is the string pointing to your drive, such as "/dev/cdrom" or "/dev/hdd". This method does a non-blocking read-only open of the device. If opening the device was successfull, it ultimately does a CDROM_GET_CAPABILITY ioctl to check whether the device is in fact a CDROM drive.

    Returns undef and sets $! if something goes wrong. You should check $Linux::CDROM::error in such a case to distinguish between the above two cases (device couldn't be opened at all or device could be opened but is not a CDROM drive):

        my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/hdc") or die $Linux::CDROM::error;

    Please note that the constructor opens your CDROM-drive and not the disc inside it. That means that you do not really need a disc inside your drive to open it. You only need one when you intend to carry out operations relating to a disc, such as playing audio, grabbing data, etc.

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR, LINUX_CDROM_NO_OPEN or LINUX_CDROM_NO_CDROM.

  • close

    Shuts down the link from your program to the CDROM-drive by doing a close(2). This does not destroy your object but quite naturally any subsequent operation on it will fail.

    You can use this to temporarily release your drive and at some other point reopen it using reopen.

    Returns a true value on success, undef otherwise.

  • reopen

    Reopens your drive after it has been shut-down using close:

        $cd->close;
        # now your CDROM is released and now interference with any
        # other application accessing the drive can happen
        ...
        $cd->reopen;
        # continue with normal operation
        

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR or LINUX_CDROM_NO_OPEN.

  • capabilities

    Returns the capabilities of this drive as an integer by issuing the CDROM_GET_CAPABILITY ioctl. This integer is the bit-wise ORing of the various capability-flags:

        # checks whether drive can play audio and has programmable speed
        if ($cd->capabilities & (CDC_PLAY_AUDIO | CDC_SELECT_SPEED)) {
            ...
        }

    The available flags:

    CDC_CLOSE_TRAY

    Drive can close tray.

    CDC_OPEN_TRAY

    Drive can open tray.

    CDC_LOCK

    Drive is locked.

    CDC_SELECT_SPEED

    Drive has programmable speed.

    CDC_SELECT_DISC

    Drive is a juke-box.

    CDC_MULTI_SESSIONS

    Drive can read multi-session discs.

    CDC_MCN

    Drive can read medium-catalog-number.

    CDC_MEDIA_CHANGED

    Drive reports on changed media.

    CDC_PLAY_AUDIO

    Drive can play audio.

    CDC_RESET

    Drive can be reset.

    CDC_IOCTLS

    Drive has non-standard ioctls.

    CDC_DRIVE_STATUS

    Drive can report its status.

    CDC_GENERIC_PACKET

    Drive can be further controlled through generic packet commands.

    CDC_CD_R

    Drive can write CD-Rs.

    CDC_CD_RW

    Drive can write CD-RWs.

    CDC_DVD

    Drive can read DVDs.

    CDC_DVD_R

    Drive can write DVD-Rs.

    CDC_DVD_RW

    Drive can write DVD_RWs.

  • drive_status

    Returns the current drive-status as an integer by issuing the CDROM_DRIVE_STATUS ioctl. This integer is the bit-wise ORing of the various status-flags:

        if ($cd->drive_status & CDS_TRAY_OPEN) {
            print "Please close the tray of your drive.";
        }

    The available flags:

    CDS_NO_INFO

    Drive doesn't return any info.

    CDS_NO_DISC

    There is no disc in the drive.

    CDS_TRAY_OPEN
    CDS_DRIVE_NOT_READY
    CDS_DISC_OK

  • disc_status

    Returns the current disc-status as an integer by issuing the CDROM_DISC_STATUS ioctl. Quite naturally, you need to have a disc inside your drive:

        if ($cd->disc_status == CDS_AUDIO) {
            print "Disc is an audio CD";
        }

    The possible return-values:

    CDS_AUDIO

    Audio CD (red book).

    CDS_DATA_1

    Yellow book form 1.

    CDS_DATA_2

    Yellow book form 2.

    CDS_XA_2_1

    Green book form 1.

    CDS_XA_2_2

    Green book form 2.

    CDS_MIXED

    Often used for CDs of games. One track is data, and some other tracks are Audio.

  • num_frames

    Returns the total number of frames on the CD (CDROM_LAST_WRITTEN ioctl).

  • next_writable

    Returns the index of the next writable frame of the CD (CDROM_NEXT_WRITABLE ioctl).

  • get_spindown

    Returns the spindown time of your CDROM drive (CDROMGETSPINDOWN ioctl).

  • set_spindown(val)

    Sets the spindown time of your drive to val which should be between 0 and 255. Your drive may not support this.

  • reset

    Tries to hard-reset the drive by issuing the CDROMRESET ioctl:

        if ($cd->reset) {
            print "reset ok";
        } else {
            print "reset failed: $!;
        }
  • eject

    Eject the CD from the drive (CDROMEJECT ioctl).

  • auto_eject(0|1)

    Turns on/off auto-ejecting of your drive (CDROMEJECT_SW ioctl). Auto-eject means the disc is ejected when the drive is shut down.

    Auto-ejecting can be disabled again with $cd->auto_eject(0).

  • close_tray

    Closes the tray of the drive if possible (CDROMCLOSETRAY ioctl).

  • lock_door(0|1)

    Locks (1) or unlocks (0) the door of the drive (CDROM_LOCKDOOR ioctl).

    Be aware that you can no longer open the tray of your drive when you locked your drive and your program ends before you've done a $cd->lock_door(0).

    Of course, this might be what you want if you want to prevent your kid from accessing the CDs with your downloaded porn-collection.

  • media_changed

    Returns a true value if the disc inside the drive has been changed ever since you opened the drive. False otherwise, undef on errors (CDROM_MEDIA_CHANGED ioctl).

  • mcn

    Returns the medium catalog number of the CD. (CDROM_GET_MCN ioctl, formerly CDROM_GET_UPC).

  • get_vol

    Returns a list with four items being the volume of channel 0 throughout channel 3 (CDROMVOLREAD ioctl).

  • set_vol(ch0, ch1, ch2, ch3)

    Sets the volume of the four channels to the respective values of ch0 to ch3 (CDROMVOLCTRL ioctl). The values must be between 0 and 255.

    As always, returns a true value on success, undef otherwise (check $! in this case).

  • play_msf(addr1, addr2)

    Plays the audio on the CD starting at addr1 and ending with addr2 by issuing the CDROMPLAYMSF ioctl. Both parameters must be instances of Linux::CDROM::Addr:

        # start with frame 1
        my $addr1 = Linux::CDROM::Addr->new(CDROM_LBA, 1);
        # end at 2 minutes, 2 seconds, first frame 
        my $addr2 = Linux::CDROM::Addr->new(CDROM_MSF, 2, 2, 1);
    
        if ( $cd->play_msf($addr1, $addr2) ) {
            print "ok, will play";
        } else {
            print "Can't play: $!";
        }

    Note that any flavour (either CDROM_LBA or CDROM_MSF) of a Linux::CDROM::Addr object will do. See METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM::Addr.

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR, LINUX_CDROM_NO_DISC_STATUS, LINUX_CDROM_NO_AUDIO or LINUX_CDROM_IOCTL_ERROR.

  • play_ti(-from => start, -to => end, [ -fromidx => startidx, -toidx => endidx ])

    Plays the audio on a CD starting with track start up to (and including) end. The arguments startidx and endidx are optional and refer to an offset in the start and end track respectively. It must be a value between 0 and 255.

    If called with no arguments at all, it plays the whole CD.

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR, LINUX_CDROM_NO_DISC_STATUS, LINUX_CDROM_NO_AUDIO, LINUX_CDROM_NO_TOCHDR or LINUX_CDROM_IOCTL_ERROR.

  • pause

    Pauses playback of your CD (CDROMPAUSE ioctl).

  • resume

    Resumes playback of your CD (CDROMRESUME ioctl).

  • start

    Starts the CDROM drive (CDROMSTART ioctl).

  • stop

    Stops the CDROM drive (CDROMSTOP ioctl). This can be used to stop audio playback.

  • read1(addr)

    Reads the frame at address addr which must be a Linux::CDROM::Addr object and returns the data as one string (CDROMREADMODE1 ioctl).

    The returned string is always 2048 bytes long or undef in case of errors.

    See also Linux::CDROM::Cookbook, Recipe 9 to find out how to make ISOs from your CD.

  • read2(addr)

    Reads the frame at address addr which must be a Linux::CDROM::Addr object and returns the data as one string (CDROMREADMODE2 ioctl). This assumes that the CD in the drive is in the Yellow Book Form 2 format.

    The returned string is always 2336 bytes long or undef in case of errors.

  • read_audio(addr, nframes)

    Treats the CD as an Audio-CD (Red Book) and reads nframes beginning at the address addr (CDROMREADAUDIO ioctl). addr must be a Linux::CDROM::Addr object.

    It returns the data as one string or undef in case of errors.

    This can be used to grab an Audio-CD. See Recipe 8 in Linux::CDROM::Cookbook on how to do it the right way.

    This method partially implements the upper bound checking not yet done by the kernel (as of 2.4.21). The case that the start-address addr is bigger than the number of frames on the CD is detected. If addr is smaller but nframes would cause reading beyond the last frame, no error is returned. Instead, the method will read the data up to the last frame and return it.

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR or DEVICE_IDX_OUT_OF_BOUNDS.

    See also Linux::CDROM::Cookbook and the entries on get_datasize and reset_datasize.

  • read_raw(addr)

    Reads the frame at address addr in raw mode. addr must be a <Linux::CDROM::Addr> object.

  • reset_datasize

    Resets the internal counter of bytes read managed by a Linux::CDROM drive. This counter only counts bytes produced by read_audio.

  • get_datasize

    Returns the value of the internal counter of bytes read.

    The existance of reset_datasize and get_datasize is purely for convenience reason. It will save you from counting the number of bytes yourself. Also, it is more efficient doing it this way.

    Usage is simple:

        $cd->reset_datasize;
    
        # now read some audio 
        $data = $cd->read_audio(...);
        ...
    
        my $bytes = $cd->get_datasize;
  • poll

    This queries the current state of the CDROM-drive by issuing the CDROMSUBCHNL ioctl. It returns an Linux::CDROM::Subchannel object.

    You will need this method if you want to write a CD-player that updates its output accordingly to what it currently does. For instance, you can use it to find out at which minute/second/frame the drive currently is at:

        $| = 1; # turn on auto-flush
        
        my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/cdrom") or die $Linux::CDROM::error;
        $cd->play_ti( -from => 1, -to => 3 );
    
        while (my $poll = $cd->poll) {
            last if $poll->status != CDROM_AUDIO_PLAY;
            printf "\r%02i:%02i:%02i [min:sec:frame]", $poll->abs_addr->as_msf;
            select undef, undef, undef, 0.2; # sleep around 0.2 secs
        }

    This method only makes sense for Audio-CD.

  • toc

    Reads the TOC-header of the inserted CD (CDROMREADTOCHDR ioctl). It returns a list with two items. The first element being the start-track (most often this will be 1) and the second item being the index of the last track.

    This is the ultra-correct way of finding the number of tracks on a CD:

        my ($first, $last) = $cd->toc;
        my $num_tracks = $last - $first + 1;
  • toc_entry(track)

    Reads the TOC-entry of track track and returns it as a Linux::CDROM::TocEntry object by issuing the CDROMREADTOCENTRY ioctl.

    You will need this method when you want to find out the offset of a particular track on a disc or when trying to figure out whether a track is data or audio:

        my $entry = $cd->toc_entry(2);
        print "Track 2 is ", $entry->is_data ? "data\n" : "audio\n";
        printf "Offset: %02i:%02i:%02i\n", $entry->addr->as_msf;

    Sets $Linux::CDROM::error to one of LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR, LINUX_CDROM_NO_TOCHDR, LINUX_CDROM_IDX_OUT_OF_BOUNDS or LINUX_CDROM_IOCTL_ERROR.

  • is_multisession

    Returns a true value if the inserted CD is a multisession CD. False if not or undef when some error occured (CDROMMULTISESSION ioctl).

METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM::Addr

Specifying positions on a CD always happens through Linux::CDROM::Addr objects. There are two addressing modes that can be easily transformed into each other so you can use whichever mode of addressing you prefer:

  • MSF

    This stands for Minute/Second/Frame and you specify a position on the CD by providing these three values. This is probably the more natural addressing for Audio-CDs. One second consists of CD_FRAMES frames. This value is currently 75.

  • LBA

    This stands for Logical Block Addressing. You specify a position by providing the frame number which starts at 0. Next frame is 1 etc. This is what makes it so logical.

This class overloads '+' and '-' so you may simply add or substract addresses. Here's how to figure out the length of a track on a CD in number of frames:

    my $entry1 = $cd->toc_entry(2);
    my $entry2 = $cd->toc_entry(3);
    
    my $length  = ($entry2->addr - $entry1->addr)->lba;
  • new(CDROM_MSF, minute, second, frame)

  • new(CDROM_LBA, frame)

    Creates a new Linux::CDROM::Addr instance in one of the two addressings. Note that internally addressing always happens through LBA.

    Note how MSF can be transformed into LBA easily:

        my $lba = ($minute * CD_SECS + $seconds) * CD_FRAMES + $frames;

    But you don't have to do that manually. This class provides the appropriate conversion routines.

  • frame

    Returns the frame of this address. This is not the absolute frame but the frame in the range of 0 and 74 according to MSF addressing.

  • second

    Returns the second of this address. This is not the absolute second but the second according to MSF addressing (in the range 0 and 59).

  • minute

    Returns the minute of this address.

  • as_lba

    Returns the absolete frame number.

  • as_msf

    Returns the address broken into minute, second and frame as a list of three values.

METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM::TocEntry

This kind of object is returned by Linux::CDROM::toc_entry(num). It represents one track on the CD. There is no separate constructor for these objects.

  • addr

    Returns the position of this track on the disc as a Linux::CDROM::Addr object.

  • is_data

    Returns a true value if this track is a data track.

  • is_audio

    Returns a true value if this track is an audio track.

METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM::Subchannel

These objects represent the state of your drive in the moment you call $cd->poll. Some operations (most notably playing Audio) on the drive are non-blocking and your program therefore continues with the execution while your drive is busy carrying out the desired operation. You can now ask the drive what it is currently doing in a tight loop. The information your drives returns to you are Linux::CDROM::Subchannel objects.

  • status

    The basic status of your drive. It returns one of the following values:

    • CDROM_AUDIO_INVALID

      Audio status not supported.

    • CDROM_AUDIO_PLAY

      Your drive is right now busy playing back an Audio track.

    • CDROM_AUDIO_PAUSED

      Audio playback is paused. You can use $cd->resume to continue it.

    • CDROM_AUDIO_COMPLETED

      Audio playback successfully completed.

    • CDROM_AUDIO_ERROR

      Audio playback stopped due to an error.

    • CDROM_AUDIO_NO_STATUS

      No current audio status to return.

  • abs_addr

    Returns a Linux::CDROM::Addr object representing the absolute position where your drive is currently playing audio.

  • rel_addr

    Returns a Linux::CDROM::Addr object representing the relative position (relative to the current track) where your drive is playing audio.

  • track

    The current track your drive is playing back.

  • index

    Yet another positional information. Returns an offset within the currently playing track, probably in the range of 0 and 255.

METHODS FOR Linux::CDROM::Format

This class offers some utility methods that are useful when working with CDROMs on a low level. All methods are class-methods so there is no object here.

  • wav_header(bytes)

    This returns a WAV header suitable for bytes audio data. If you put this at the end of a file and stuff the data as returned by Linux::CDROM::read_audio behind it, you'll get a valid WAV file that can be played back by any sane wave-player:

        # create a header for 30 million bytes of data
        my $header = Linux::CDROM::Format->wav_header( 30_000_000 );
        print WAVFILE $header;
        print WAVFILE $data;

    The header specifies that the data will have a sample-rate of 44100Hz, 16 bit resolution and two channels (which is the format of a Red Book Audio-CD).

  • raw2yellow1(data)

    When data was produced by a call to Linux::CDROM::read_raw, this method can be used to break down the chunk into its components according to Yellow Book Form 1 layout. It returns them as a list six values:

        my ($sync, $head, $data, $edc, $zero, $ecc) = 
            Linux::CDROM::Format->raw2yellow1($raw_data);
  • raw2yellow2(data)

    Breaks down data into its components according to Yellow Book Form 2 layout. It returns a list of three values:

        my ($sync, $head, $data) =
            Linux::CDROM::Format->raw2yellow2($raw_data);
  • raw2green1(data)

    Breaks down data into its components according to Green Book Form 1 layout. It returns a list of six values:

        my ($sync, $head, $sub, $data, $edc, $ecc) =
            Linux::CDROM::Format->raw2green1($raw_data);
  • raw2green2(data)

    Breaks down data into its components according to Green Book Form 2 layout. It returns a list of five values:

        my ($sync, $head, $sub, $data, $edc) =
            Linux::CDROM::Format->raw2green2($raw_data);

ERROR REPORTING

All methods return undef when an error occured. Furthermore, Linux::CDROM uses a simple package variable $Linux::CDROM::error to give you details on the errors that occured.

This variable is a double-typed value so it returns a string with the error description in string context. This is useful when you want to immediately let your script die on errors:

    my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/hdd") 
        or die $Linux::CDROM::error;
        

However, you can also use symbolic constants to check which error occured in order to roll your own error-handling:

    my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/hdd");
    
    if ($Linux::CDROM::error == LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR) {
        print "operation successful";
    }
    elsif ($Linux::CDROM::error == LINUX_CDROM_NO_OPEN) {
        print "open failed: $!";
        # custom error handling follows
        ...
    }
    elsif ($Linux::CDROM::error == LINUX_CDROM_NO_CDROM) {
        print "device is no CDROM drive";
        # custom error handling follows
        ...
    }

$Linux::CDROM::error is guaranteed to have a false value when no error occured. So you could also write:

    my $cd = Linux::CDROM->new("/dev/hdd");
    if (! $Linux::CDROM::error) {
        print "No error occured";
    } else {
        die $!;
    }

There is a connection between this variable and $! in that in case of errors, the string stored in $Linux::CDROM::error has the format "error-description: $!".

The reason why this module doesn't only rely on $! is because the errors in $! are usually those returned from the ioctl system-call. This is very often "Input/Output error" so the content of $! maybe of limited help.

See the description for each method to find out whether it sets $Linux::CDROM::error.

The possible numerical values of $Linux::CDROM::error are those:

LINUX_CDROM_NO_ERROR

No error occured.

LINUX_CDROM_NO_OPEN

Opening the drive (not the tray!) failed.

LINUX_CDROM_NO_CDROM

Drive is no CDROM drive.

LINUX_CDROM_NO_TOCHDR

Couldn't read the TOC header of the CD.

LINUX_CDROM_NO_AUDIO

CD is not an Audio-CD.

LINUX_CDROM_NO_DISC_STATUS

Couldn't retrieve the disc-status of the CD.

LINUX_CDROM_IDX_OUT_OF_BOUNDS

The index was out of bounds. Can for instance happen when you request to look at a non-existent TOC-entry.

LINUX_CDROM_IOCTL_ERROR

This is a generic error. It means that although the circumstances for the desired operation were ok (for instance: an Audio-CD was in the drive when you wanted to play the audio) the ioctl failed (which can happen when you request to play beginning with minute 60 but the CD only has 40 minutes of audio).

EXPORT

Constants exported by default

    CDC_CD_R
    CDC_CD_RW
    CDC_CLOSE_TRAY
    CDC_DRIVE_STATUS
    CDC_DVD
    CDC_DVD_R
    CDC_DVD_RAM
    CDC_GENERIC_PACKET
    CDC_IOCTLS
    CDC_LOCK
    CDC_MCN
    CDC_MEDIA_CHANGED
    CDC_MULTI_SESSION
    CDC_OPEN_TRAY
    CDC_PLAY_AUDIO
    CDC_RESET
    CDC_SELECT_DISC
    CDC_SELECT_SPEED
    CDROM_AUDIO_COMPLETED
    CDROM_AUDIO_ERROR
    CDROM_AUDIO_INVALID
    CDROM_AUDIO_NO_STATUS
    CDROM_AUDIO_PAUSED
    CDROM_AUDIO_PLAY
    CDROM_DATA_TRACK
    CDROM_LBA
    CDROM_LEADOUT
    CDROM_MAX_SLOTS
    CDROM_MSF
    CDROM_PACKET_SIZE
    CDSL_CURRENT
    CDSL_NONE
    CDS_AUDIO
    CDS_DATA_1
    CDS_DATA_2
    CDS_DISC_OK
    CDS_DRIVE_NOT_READY
    CDS_MIXED
    CDS_NO_DISC
    CDS_NO_INFO
    CDS_TRAY_OPEN
    CDS_XA_2_1
    CDS_XA_2_2
    CD_CHUNK_SIZE
    CD_ECC_SIZE
    CD_EDC_SIZE
    CD_FRAMES
    CD_FRAMESIZE
    CD_FRAMESIZE_RAW
    CD_FRAMESIZE_RAW0
    CD_FRAMESIZE_RAW1
    CD_FRAMESIZE_RAWER
    CD_FRAMESIZE_SUB
    CD_HEAD_SIZE
    CD_MINS
    CD_MSF_OFFSET
    CD_NUM_OF_CHUNKS
    CD_PART_MASK
    CD_PART_MAX
    CD_SECS
    CD_SUBHEAD_SIZE
    CD_SYNC_SIZE
    CD_XA_HEAD
    CD_XA_SYNC_HEAD
    CD_XA_TAIL
    CD_ZERO_SIZE
    CGC_DATA_NONE
    CGC_DATA_READ
    CGC_DATA_UNKNOWN
    CGC_DATA_WRITE
    EDRIVE_CANT_DO_THIS

Additional constants

Those (plus the default constants) can be imported on request by doing a

    use Linux::CDROM qw(:all);

I strongly doubt you will need them.

    CDROMAUDIOBUFSIZ
    CDROMCLOSETRAY
    CDROMEJECT
    CDROMEJECT_SW
    CDROMGETSPINDOWN
    CDROMMULTISESSION
    CDROMPAUSE
    CDROMPLAYBLK
    CDROMPLAYMSF
    CDROMPLAYTRKIND
    CDROMREADALL
    CDROMREADAUDIO
    CDROMREADCOOKED
    CDROMREADMODE1
    CDROMREADMODE2
    CDROMREADRAW
    CDROMREADTOCENTRY
    CDROMREADTOCHDR
    CDROMRESET
    CDROMRESUME
    CDROMSEEK
    CDROMSETSPINDOWN
    CDROMSTART
    CDROMSTOP
    CDROMSUBCHNL
    CDROMVOLCTRL
    CDROMVOLREAD
    CDROM_CHANGER_NSLOTS
    CDROM_CLEAR_OPTIONS
    CDROM_DEBUG
    CDROM_DISC_STATUS
    CDROM_DRIVE_STATUS
    CDROM_GET_CAPABILITY
    CDROM_GET_UPC
    CDROM_LAST_WRITTEN
    CDROM_LOCKDOOR
    CDROM_MEDIA_CHANGED
    CDROM_NEXT_WRITABLE
    CDROM_SELECT_DISC
    CDROM_SELECT_SPEED
    CDROM_SEND_PACKET
    CDROM_SET_OPTIONS
    DVD_AUTH
    DVD_AUTH_ESTABLISHED
    DVD_AUTH_FAILURE
    DVD_CGMS_RESTRICTED
    DVD_CGMS_SINGLE
    DVD_CGMS_UNRESTRICTED
    DVD_CPM_COPYRIGHTED
    DVD_CPM_NO_COPYRIGHT
    DVD_CP_SEC_EXIST
    DVD_CP_SEC_NONE
    DVD_HOST_SEND_CHALLENGE
    DVD_HOST_SEND_KEY2
    DVD_HOST_SEND_RPC_STATE
    DVD_INVALIDATE_AGID
    DVD_LAYERS
    DVD_LU_SEND_AGID
    DVD_LU_SEND_ASF
    DVD_LU_SEND_CHALLENGE
    DVD_LU_SEND_KEY1
    DVD_LU_SEND_RPC_STATE
    DVD_LU_SEND_TITLE_KEY
    DVD_READ_STRUCT
    DVD_STRUCT_BCA
    DVD_STRUCT_COPYRIGHT
    DVD_STRUCT_DISCKEY
    DVD_STRUCT_MANUFACT
    DVD_STRUCT_PHYSICAL
    DVD_WRITE_STRUCT
    GPCMD_BLANK
    GPCMD_CLOSE_TRACK
    GPCMD_FLUSH_CACHE
    GPCMD_FORMAT_UNIT
    GPCMD_GET_CONFIGURATION
    GPCMD_GET_EVENT_STATUS_NOTIFICATION
    GPCMD_GET_MEDIA_STATUS
    GPCMD_GET_PERFORMANCE
    GPCMD_INQUIRY
    GPCMD_LOAD_UNLOAD
    GPCMD_MECHANISM_STATUS
    GPCMD_MODE_SELECT_10
    GPCMD_MODE_SENSE_10
    GPCMD_PAUSE_RESUME
    GPCMD_PLAYAUDIO_TI
    GPCMD_PLAY_AUDIO_10
    GPCMD_PLAY_AUDIO_MSF
    GPCMD_PLAY_AUDIO_TI
    GPCMD_PLAY_CD
    GPCMD_PREVENT_ALLOW_MEDIUM_REMOVAL
    GPCMD_READ_10
    GPCMD_READ_12
    GPCMD_READ_CD
    GPCMD_READ_CDVD_CAPACITY
    GPCMD_READ_CD_MSF
    GPCMD_READ_DISC_INFO
    GPCMD_READ_DVD_STRUCTURE
    GPCMD_READ_FORMAT_CAPACITIES
    GPCMD_READ_HEADER
    GPCMD_READ_SUBCHANNEL
    GPCMD_READ_TOC_PMA_ATIP
    GPCMD_READ_TRACK_RZONE_INFO
    GPCMD_REPAIR_RZONE_TRACK
    GPCMD_REPORT_KEY
    GPCMD_REQUEST_SENSE
    GPCMD_RESERVE_RZONE_TRACK
    GPCMD_SCAN
    GPCMD_SEEK
    GPCMD_SEND_DVD_STRUCTURE
    GPCMD_SEND_EVENT
    GPCMD_SEND_KEY
    GPCMD_SEND_OPC
    GPCMD_SET_READ_AHEAD
    GPCMD_SET_SPEED
    GPCMD_SET_STREAMING
    GPCMD_START_STOP_UNIT
    GPCMD_STOP_PLAY_SCAN
    GPCMD_TEST_UNIT_READY
    GPCMD_VERIFY_10
    GPCMD_WRITE_10
    GPCMD_WRITE_AND_VERIFY_10
    GPMODE_ALL_PAGES
    GPMODE_AUDIO_CTL_PAGE
    GPMODE_CAPABILITIES_PAGE
    GPMODE_CDROM_PAGE
    GPMODE_FAULT_FAIL_PAGE
    GPMODE_POWER_PAGE
    GPMODE_R_W_ERROR_PAGE
    GPMODE_TO_PROTECT_PAGE
    GPMODE_WRITE_PARMS_PAGE
    mechtype_caddy
    mechtype_cartridge_changer
    mechtype_individual_changer
    mechtype_popup
    mechtype_tray

LIMITATIONS

This one most definitely only works for Linux so far.

All the DVD-related controls are unimplemented.

Other unimplemented ioctls are:

    CDROMREADCOOKED
    CDROMSEEK
    CDROMPLAYBLK
    CDROMREADALL
    CDROM_SET_OPTIONS
    CDROM_CLEAR_OPTIONS
    CDROM_DEBUG
    CDROM_SEND_PACKET

See Linux::CDROM::Cookbook, Recipe 10 on how to circumvent this limitation.

BUGS

Possibly. One problem is that there's no sensible way to equip the module with tests and so there are none when you install it.

SEE ALSO

For a more practical approach to, see Linux::CDROM::Cookbook.

Since this module allows you to access your drive on a very low-level (as low as the kernel permits it), it may help to google a bit for general issues, such as track layout on a CDROM etc.

AUTHOR

Tassilo von Parseval, <tassilo.von.parseval@rwth-aachen.de>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

Copyright (C) 2004-2005 by Tassilo von Parseval

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself, either Perl version 5.8.2 or, at your option, any later version of Perl 5 you may have available.